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News Evolutionarily, grandmas are good for grandkids — up to a point

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Grandmothers are great — generally speaking. But evolutionarily speaking, it’s puzzling why women past their reproductive years live so long.

​Two new studies published February 7 in Current Biology suggest  Grandma’s age and how close she lives to her grandchildren can affect those children’s survival. The studies are part of a broader effort to explain the existence of menopause, a rarity in the animal kingdom.

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Melissa Melby, medical anthropologist at UD, comments on the so-called “grandmother hypothesis” suggesting women’s longevity is due to contributions to their grandkids’ survival.

Melissa Melby, medical anthropologist at UD, comments on the so-called “grandmother hypothesis” suggesting women’s longevity is due to contributions to their grandkids’ survival.

3/19/2019
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Evolutionarily, grandmas are good for grandkids — up to a point
 
  • Department of Anthropology
  • 135 Munroe Hall
  • University of Delaware
  • Newark, DE 19716, USA
  • Phone: 302-831-1851
  • anthropology@udel.edu
  • Delaware Will Shine